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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2020  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 60-66

Knowledges, attitudes, and practices on cervical cancer screening by women in Brazzaville-Congo


1 Department of Health Program Management and Epidemiologic, Inter-State Centre for Higher Education in Public Health of Central Africa (CIESPAC), Brazzaville-Congo; Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics; Department of Public Health; Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I; League of Initiative and Active Research for Women's Health and Education (LIRASEF), Cameroon
2 Department of Health Program Management and Epidemiologic, Inter-State Centre for Higher Education in Public Health of Central Africa (CIESPAC), Brazzaville-, Congo
3 Department of Gynecology and Obstetrics; Department of Public Health; Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaound I, Cameroon
4 United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), Chad

Correspondence Address:
Prof. Pierre Marie Tebeu
Faculty of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University of Yaoundé I, Yaoundé, Cameroon. Inter-States Centre for Higher Education in Public Health of Central Africa

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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/JCRP.JCRP_7_20

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Background: Cervical cancer is a serious disease, responsible for more than 311,000 deaths worldwide each year. The objective of the study was to assess the knowledge, attitudes, and practices (KAPs) regarding cervical cancer screening of women aged 25–65. Materials and Methods: This was an analytical KAP study conducted from May 2, 2018, to August 10, 2018, including women aged 25–65 years, attending the gyneco-obstetrics departments of six hospitals in Brazzaville. The variables of interest were sociodemographic and reproductive characteristics, KAPs. Frequencies, central tendency parameters, and odds ratios were calculated using Epi Info 7.2.2.6 software. We used Pearson, Fisher, and Wald statistical tests, with a significance level of 0.05. Results: We interviewed 169 women aged 25–65 years (average 35 [±9.05] years). The majority had an unsatisfactory level of knowledge (70.41%), favorable attitudes (56.21%), and bad practices (43.20%). Factors associated with better knowledge were at least secondary school education (adjusted odds ratio [ORa]: 1.76 [1.02–3.34]) and being employed (ORa: 4.24 [2.60–6.93]). Women with the best knowledge had the best attitudes (ORa: 3.86 [2.38–6.26]) and best practices (ORa: 5.28 [3.08–9.05]). Those with better attitudes had better practices (ORa: 2.94 [1.87–4.61]). Conclusion: Women in Brazzaville lack knowledge about cervical cancer. Better knowledge and attitudes were associated with best practices, hence the need to implement awareness – raising strategies to give greater impetus to the participation of Congolese women in cervical cancer screening.


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